Get the up-to-date dr 312 2002 form-2024 now

Get Form
dr 312 fillable Preview on Page 1.

Here's how it works

01. Edit your form online
01. Edit your dr 312 fillable form online
Type text, add images, blackout confidential details, add comments, highlights and more.
02. Sign it in a few clicks
02. Sign it in a few clicks
Draw your signature, type it, upload its image, or use your mobile device as a signature pad.
03. Share your form with others
03. Share your form with others
Send form dr 312 via email, link, or fax. You can also download it, export it or print it out.

The best way to edit Dr 312 2002 form in PDF format online

Form edit decoration
9.5
Ease of Setup
DocHub User Ratings on G2
9.0
Ease of Use
DocHub User Ratings on G2

Adjusting documents with our feature-rich and intuitive PDF editor is easy. Follow the instructions below to fill out Dr 312 2002 form online quickly and easily:

  1. Sign in to your account. Log in with your email and password or register a free account to try the service prior to choosing the subscription.
  2. Import a document. Drag and drop the file from your device or add it from other services, like Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, or an external link.
  3. Edit Dr 312 2002 form. Effortlessly add and highlight text, insert pictures, checkmarks, and signs, drop new fillable fields, and rearrange or delete pages from your document.
  4. Get the Dr 312 2002 form completed. Download your modified document, export it to the cloud, print it from the editor, or share it with others via a Shareable link or as an email attachment.

Make the most of DocHub, one of the most easy-to-use editors to quickly handle your paperwork online!

be ready to get more

Complete this form in 5 minutes or less

Get form

Got questions?

We have answers to the most popular questions from our customers. If you can't find an answer to your question, please contact us.
Contact us
Form DR-312 should be filed with the clerk of the court and duly recorded in the public records of the county or counties where the decedent owned property. If you have any questions, or need assistance, call Taxpayer Services at 850-488-6800, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
Currently, there is no estate tax in Florida. The state abolished its estate tax in 2004. Prior to the change in 2004, federal law allowed a credit for death taxes, at the state level but on the federal tax return.
Florida doesn't have an inheritance (or death) tax. However, the federal government imposes estate taxes that apply to all residents. Federal estate taxes are only applicable if the total estate's value exceeds $11.7 million as of 2021.
An inheritance tax, also called an estate tax, is a tax based on the wealth of a deceased person. Florida does not have an inheritance tax, so Florida's inheritance tax rate is zero. A beneficiary of a deceased person in Florida does not owe any state taxes on inherited property.
There are a few states that levy taxes on the estate of the deceased, generally referred to as the inheritance tax (or the death tax). The good news is Florida does not have a separate state inheritance tax.

People also ask

There is no Florida estate tax, though you may still be subject to the federal estate tax. It's one of 38 states in the country that doesn't levy a tax on estates, regardless of size.
There are a few states that levy taxes on the estate of the deceased, generally referred to as the inheritance tax (or the death tax). The good news is Florida does not have a separate state inheritance tax.
The executor has to file a 1041 (the return form for estates and trusts) if the estate earns more than $600 in a year. The form must be filed using the taxpayer ID obtained when opening the estate account.
Florida tax is imposed only on those estates subject to federal estate tax filing requirements and entitled to a credit for state death taxes (Chapter 198, F.S.). Estate tax is not due if a federal estate tax return (Form 706 or 706-NA) is not required to be filed.
For estates between $1 million and $3 million: 2.5% For estates between $3 million and $5 million: 2% For estates between $5 million and $10 million: 1.5% For estates of $10 million and above: 1%

Related links