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There are 4 extrinsic factors that can cause these wounds\u2014pressure, friction, humidity, and shear force. Pressure is a crucial factor in PU development. Pressure of 70 mmHg over a bony prominence for 2 hours or more is enough to cause an ischemic wound. These factors might predispose a patient to PU development.
Tissue tolerance is the ability of plants to tolerate elevated levels of Na+ in the shoot; it requires Na+ compartmentalisation into the vacuole and accumulation of compatible solutes in the cytoplasm. Halophytes are plants native to saline environments and that have high salinity tolerance.
Radiation Biology and Radiation Safety According to the target/stem cell concept, the radiation tolerance of any organ or tissue is defined by the number and the intrinsic sensitivity of the tissue-specific target cells.
Poor oxygen delivery to the tissues can result in a lower tissue tolerance. Examples include chronic illnesses such as diabetes, a history of smoking, or other vascular diseases. Chronic diseases such as renal failure, cancer, and diabetes mellitus put people at higher risk for developing pressure ulcers.
How pressure ulcers develop. Pressure ulcers can develop when a large amount of pressure is applied to an area of skin over a short period of time. They can also occur when less pressure is applied over a longer period of time. The extra pressure disrupts the flow of blood through the skin.

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Extrinsic risk factors Pressure. Shear. Friction. Skin microclimate.
Anyone can get a pressure ulcer, but the following things can make them more likely to form: being over 70 \u2013 older people are more likely to have mobility problems and skin that's more easily damaged through dehydration and other factors. being confined to bed with illness or after surgery.
Extrinsic risk factors Pressure. Shear. Friction. Skin microclimate.
Poor oxygen delivery to the tissues can result in a lower tissue tolerance. Examples include chronic illnesses such as diabetes, a history of smoking, or other vascular diseases. Chronic diseases such as renal failure, cancer, and diabetes mellitus put people at higher risk for developing pressure ulcers.
In addition to immobility and recuperation from surgery, other factors which may increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers include: poor nutrition, dehydration, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, low albumin levels/anemia and obesity.

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