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Q: Why is H1N1 flu sometimes called \u201cswine flu?\u201d A: This virus was originally referred to as \u201cswine flu\u201d because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs in North America.
A respiratory sample (simple nose or throat swab) is required for a confirmed diagnosis of swine flu. In humans, these tests include the Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test (RT-PCR), virus isolation test, and assays to detect a 4-fold increase in influenza virus antigens.
The main swine influenza viruses circulating in U.S. pigs in recent years have been, swine triple reassortant (tr) H1N1 influenza virus, trH3N2 virus, and trH1N2 virus. Take action to prevent the spread of flu between pigs and people.
Overview. The H1N1 flu, commonly known as swine flu, is primarily caused by the H1N1 strain of the flu (influenza) virus. H1N1 is a type of influenza A virus, and H1N1 is one of several flu virus strains that can cause the seasonal flu. Symptoms of the H1N1 flu are the same as those of the seasonal flu.
Influenza A is the most common type. H1N1 flu is a subtype of influenza A. Subtypes of influenza A are categorized based on two proteins on the surface of the virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). There are many H and N subtypes, and each one is numbered.
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H1N1 flu is a subtype of influenza A. Subtypes of influenza A are categorized based on two proteins on the surface of the virus, hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). There are many H and N subtypes, and each one is numbered. All H and N flu subtypes are influenza A viruses.
Why is the 2009 H1N1 virus sometimes called \u201cswine flu\u201d? This virus was originally referred to as \u201cswine flu\u201d because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in the virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs (swine) in North America.
H1N1 influenza is a subtype of influenza A virus, a communicable viral illness which causes upper and in some cases lower respiratory tract infections in its host. This results in symptoms such as nasal secretions, chills, fever, decreased appetite, and in some cases, lower respiratory tract disease.
Q: Why is H1N1 flu sometimes called \u201cswine flu?\u201d A: This virus was originally referred to as \u201cswine flu\u201d because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs in North America.
Ideally, swab specimens should be collected using swabs with a synthetic tip (e.g. polyester or Dacron®) and an aluminum or plastic shaft. Swabs with cotton tips and wooden shafts are not recommended. Specimens collected with swabs made of calcium alginate are not acceptable.

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