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How to calm rosacea flare-ups Soothe skin with a gentle, fragrance-free moisturizer. Use a humidifier to prevent dry air from removing moisture from the skin. Drink enough water to stay hydrated and prevent the skin from drying. Dip a towel in cold water and drape it around the neck.
Any number of skin care products may cause your face to sting, burn, or itch for what seems an eternity. Anything that causes your rosacea to flare is called a trigger. Sunlight and hairspray are common rosacea triggers. Other common triggers include heat, stress, alcohol, and spicy foods.
Results. The most frequently reported triggers implicated in rosacea include alcohol, spicy food, cinnamaldehyde-containing foods (e.g., tomatoes, citrus fruits, chocolate), hot drinks, and histamine-rich foods (e.g., aged cheese, wine, processed meats).
Flare-ups might be triggered by: Hot drinks and spicy foods. Red wine and other alcoholic beverages. Temperature extremes. Sun or wind. Emotions. Exercise. Drugs that dilate blood vessels, including some blood pressure medications. Some cosmetic, skin or hair care products.
Bumps and pimples: Small red solid bumps or pus-filled pimples often develop. Sometimes the bumps might resemble acne, but blackheads are absent. Burning or stinging might be present. Visible blood vessels: Small blood vessels become visible on the skin of many people who have rosacea.
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Foods that help rosacea Fish high in omega-3, like salmon, herring, sardines, mackerel, and lake trout. Certain nuts and seeds, including walnuts, hemp seeds, flaxseeds, and chia seeds. Peanut butter. Eggs. Olive oil.
If you have rosacea, you'll likely have redness on your face at some point. The redness may show up as flushing that lasts a little longer each time. Without treatment for rosacea, this redness can become permanent.
If you are under a lot of stress or feeling anxious, you may notice flare-ups of your rosacea. Your mental and physical health play a role in the condition, and people who are going through menopause, caffeine withdrawal, or who have a chronic cough may notice that their rosacea is worse.
There's currently no cure for rosacea, but treatment can help control the symptoms. Long-term treatment is usually necessary, although there may be periods when your symptoms improve and you can stop treatment temporarily.
Anything that causes your rosacea to flare is called a trigger. Sunlight and hairspray are common rosacea triggers. Other common triggers include heat, stress, alcohol, and spicy foods.

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