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Under Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules, to refuse an inheritance, you must execute a written disclaimer that clearly expresses your "irrevocable and unqualified" intent to refuse the bequest.
The technical term is "disclaiming" it. If you are considering disclaiming an inheritance, you need to understand the effect of your refusal\u2014known as the "disclaimer"\u2014and the procedure you must follow to ensure that it is considered qualified under federal and state law.
A qualified disclaimer is a part of the U.S. tax code that allows estate assets to pass to a beneficiary without being subject to income tax. Legally, the disclaimer portrays the transfer of assets as if the intended beneficiary never actually received them.
In order to disclaim an inheritance, you will need to write a Disclaimer, which states that you are disclaiming your inheritance in writing. Within your Disclaimer, you will need to explain what is being disclaimed, whether it is only part of your inheritance or all of it, as well as sign the document to make it legal.
Key Takeaways. Common reasons for disclaiming an inheritance include not wishing to pay taxes on the assets or ensuring that the inheritance goes to another beneficiary\u2014for example, a grandchild. Specific IRS requirements must be followed in order for a disclaimer to be qualified under federal law.
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One way for an asset to avoid gift tax liability is if it is a qualified disclaimed gift. The government does not consider a gift or inheritance to be a gift, and it subject to the gift tax if the original recipient refused or disclaimed it.
You disclaim the assets within nine months of the death of the person you inherited them from. (There's an exception for minor beneficiaries; they have until nine months after they reach the age of majority to disclaim.) You receive no benefits from the proceeds of the assets you're disclaiming.
Unlike disclaiming, a beneficiary can refuse part of their inheritance, for example a share in a property but still accept their share of liquid assets. The refused section of inheritance bypasses the intended beneficiary completely and therefore there is no tax implications on their estate.
The answer is yes. The technical term is "disclaiming" it. If you are considering disclaiming an inheritance, you need to understand the effect of your refusal\u2014known as the "disclaimer"\u2014and the procedure you must follow to ensure that it is considered qualified under federal and state law.
You disclaim the assets within nine months of the death of the person you inherited them from. (There's an exception for minor beneficiaries; they have until nine months after they reach the age of majority to disclaim.) You receive no benefits from the proceeds of the assets you're disclaiming.

disclaimer of inheritance form