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With winter quickly approaching, it is the time of year when I begin to receive calls from landlords and tenants alike asking, Can I evict my tenant, or be evicted by my landlord, during the winter? While many callers think the answer is no, they are mistaken; a landlord can terminate a tenancy and evict a tenant
Terminating a tenancy However, if you do not have a fixed-term tenancy, the landlord can ask you to leave during the first 6 months without giving a reason. They must serve a valid written notice of termination and give you a minimum 90-day notice period.
A California month-to-month lease agreement is a short-term rental contract that can be canceled by either the landlord or tenant. If the tenant has been on the property for one (1) year or less, the notice for termination shall be a minimum of thirty (30) days, if more than one (1) year, sixty (60) days.
You asked if any state bans winter evictions and for a comparison of Massachusetts eviction laws to Connecticuts. No state bans winter evictions.
The landlord cannot force you to renew the lease. If you choose not to renew, they have to give you a proper notice of non-renewal before evicting you. This is usually 30 days, but it can be more based on whether a law like the Chicago Residential Landlord and Tenant ordinance applies.
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In California, landlords may terminate a lease agreement with or without just cause. Termination without cause is permitted for landlords who do not want to renew a lease and some rental agreements. Landlords are allowed to end a month-to-month tenancy without giving cause but are still required to give 30-days notice.
New Hampshire Eviction Process Timeline Notice Received by TenantsAverage TimelineIssuing an Official Notice7 days to 30 daysIssuing and Serving of Summons and ComplaintA few days to a few weeksTenant Files for Appearance7 daysCourt Hearing and Judgment10 days2 more rows Aug 11, 2022
Unless the rental agreement provides a shorter notice period, a California tenant must give their landlord 30 days notice to end a month-to-month tenancy. Tenants should check their rental agreement to see if it requires giving notice on the first of the month or on another specific date.
A landlord can use a 30 day-notice to end a month-to-month tenancy if the tenant has been renting for less than a year. A landlord should use a 60-day notice if the tenant has been renting for more than one year and the landlord wants the tenant to move out.
A month-to-month tenancy may be terminated by either the landlord or the tenant simply by giving written notice from one side to the other. Unless the rental agreement or lease provides for a different time period, the notice to terminate must be given to the landlord at least 30 days before the tenant moves out.

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