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A person certainly can have more than one trust. The question of whether they should depend on the person. Almost every person can benefit from having a revocable living trust. There are multiple potential benefits if one has this type of trust, with the most commonly known benefit being probate avoidance.
A living trust in North Carolina (also known as an inter vivos trust) is set up by the grantor, a person placing assets in trust. When you establish a trust like this, your assets will be owned in the name of the trust, but managed for your benefit while you are alive.
Typically, when a married couple utilizes a Revocable Living Trust-based estate plan, each spouse creates and funds his or her own separate Revocable Living Trust. This results in two trusts. However, in the right circumstances, a married couple may be better served by creating a single Joint Trust.
Separate trusts provide more flexibility in the event of a death in the marriage. Since the trust property is already divided, separate trusts preserve the surviving spouses ability to amend or revoke assets held within their own trust, while ensuring that the deceased spouses trust cannot be amended after death.
A joint revocable trust is probably the easiest form of living revocable trusts for a married couple to use. A joint revocable trust merges the estate planning of a couple using a single trust document.
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In general, most experts agree that Separate Trusts can provide more asset protection. Joint Trust: Marital assets are all together in a single trust. This means theres less asset protection, because if theres ever a judgment over one of the spouses, all of the assets could end up being at risk.
Separate trusts provide more flexibility in the event of a death in the marriage. Since the trust property is already divided, separate trusts preserve the surviving spouses ability to amend or revoke assets held within their own trust, while ensuring that the deceased spouses trust cannot be amended after death.
Assuming you have no creditor concerns, both spouses want all the assets to go to the surviving spouse, and state death tax will not be an issue, a joint trust may be the way to go, for several reasons: A joint trust is easier to fund and maintain during the couples lifetime.
In general, most experts agree that Separate Trusts can provide more asset protection. Joint Trust: Marital assets are all together in a single trust. This means theres less asset protection, because if theres ever a judgment over one of the spouses, all of the assets could end up being at risk.
One advantage for using a trust is that trusts can be used to begin distributing property before death, at death or even sometime afterwards. That isnt helpful or important in all cases, but it provides a level of flexibility that a will simply cant.

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