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There are seven protected classes in the Act. Housing discrimination is prohibited based on: race; national origin; sex; religion; color; disability; and familial status. For cooperative housing developments it is important that they understand and follow the Fair Housing Act laws.
It is illegal discrimination to take any of the following actions because of race, color, religion, sex (including gender identity and sexual orientation), disability, familial status, or national origin: Refuse to rent or sell housing. Refuse to negotiate for housing. Otherwise make housing unavailable.
In cases tried before a HUD Administrative Law Judge, civil penalties of up to $16,000 for a first violation, increasing to $65,000 for third violations, may be imposed. In cases brought by the Justice Department, the civil penalties can be up to $150,000.
Under these revised amounts, someone can be assessed a maximum civil penalty of $21,039 for his or her first violation of the Fair Housing Act.
There are no exemptions to the advertising provision of the Fair Housing Act which stipulates that you cannot make, print or publish a discriminatory statement. And no one is exempt from the Civil Rights Act of 1866, which prohibits all racial discrimination in the sale or rental of property.
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The maximum civil penalties are: $16,000, for a first violation of the Act; $37,500 if a previous violation has occurred within the preceding five-year period; and $65,000 if two or more previous violations have occurred within the preceding seven-year period.
In California, the main exemption applies to an owner-occupied single-family home, where the owner does not rent to more than one individual, and the owner complies with FEHAs prohibition against discriminatory statements, notices, or advertisements.
Housing providers who refuse to rent or sell homes to people based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability are violating federal law, and HUD will vigorously pursue enforcement actions against them.
The State of California Department of Consumer Affairs can help with questions or complaints regarding landlord/tenant relationships, including repair issues, safety violations, and Health and Safety Code violations. For further information, call (800) 952-5210, or visit the website at .
For more information on your rights or to file a complaint about the landlords actions, you may contact the North Carolina Human Relations Commission or the Fair Housing Project of Legal Aid of North Carolina .

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