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Does a directive have to be notarized? The law specifically states that a "Directive to Physicians" does not have to be notarized. A physician, health care facility, or health care professional may not require it be notarized nor may any of them require you to use a specific form.
Through advance directives, you can make legally valid decisions about your future medical treatment. You do not need a lawyer to complete your advance directives. However, you should be aware that each state has its own laws for creating advance directives.
There are two main types of advance directive \u2014 the \u201cLiving Will\u201d and the \u201cDurable Power of Attorney for Health Care.\u201d There are also hybrid documents which combine elements of the Living Will with those of the Durable Power of Attorney. A Living Will is the oldest type of health care advance directive.
Does a directive have to be notarized? The law specifically states that a "Directive to Physicians" does not have to be notarized. A physician, health care facility, or health care professional may not require it be notarized nor may any of them require you to use a specific form.
The most common types of advance directives are the living will and the durable power of attorney for health care (sometimes known as the medical power of attorney). There are many advance directive formats.

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A specific and common example of an advance directive is a \u201cdo not resuscitate\u201d order (or DNR), which guides care only if your heart stops beating (cardiac arrest) or you are no longer breathing.
The most important advantage of an advanced directive is it allows a person to express choices and wishes to health-care providers. This strongly asserts the patient's choice into what treatments or procedures will be used in an emergency.
Texas Law. Known as the Texas Advanced Directives Act, this chapter governs how and when three advanced medical directives (directive to physicians, medical powers of attorney, and do not resuscitate orders) may be issued, executed, and revoked.
Advance directives generally fall into three categories: living will, power of attorney and health care proxy. LIVING WILL: This is a written document that specifies what types of medical treatment are desired. A living will can be very specific or very general.
A Power of Attorney appoints someone else to make decisions on your behalf, whereas an ACD sets out your wishes directly to your medical treatment providers should you be unable to communicate what those wishes for medical treatment are.

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